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5 Practical Steps to Making Rotary Instruments that Surgeons Want to Use - Step 5

 

A bone drill with an AO shank

5 practical steps to making rotary instruments that surgeons want to use - FREE eCourse

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Step 5: Drill your way deep into the medical components market

In this eCourse, we’ve focused only on rotary instruments. If you’re a tool maker, this is probably your best avenue into the growing medical market, because, as we’ve shown, tool makers have a lot of know-how that can be applied to the production of premium instruments. One additional requirement is that you will need ISO:13485 certification, which governs the management of the design and manufacture of medical devices.

If you’re already a maker of medical instruments, hopefully this course has helped you glean a few useful tips from your tool making contemporaries; on ways to enhance your instrument designs and manufacturing techniques.

A recession proof market ?

The medical market is a little different to the industrial cutting tools market. Cutting tool demand is very closely linked to the economic cycle. During a recession, demand plummets. But medical is more stable. With the baby boomer generation entering retirement and old age, a lot of money is, and will continue to be, spent on medical procedures and consequently, the prostheses and instruments used in those procedures.

Prosthetics and non-rotary instruments

The medical market is much larger than just rotary instruments. Tool grinders are also having a huge impact on the design and manufacturing techniques for prosthetics and complex non-rotary instruments such as femoral rasps. Because of the complex mathematics and process control features built right into the core of the control system, a tool grinder has some pretty compelling advantages over machining for producing these difficult, CAD generated parts.

1) A knee implant and 2) a femoral bone rasp

1) A knee implant and 2) a femoral bone rasp

As an example, ANCA’s ANCAM NX software works in conjunction with the most popular CAD/CAM system for medical components (Siemens PLM NX). In this setup, the CAD/CAM software handles the geometry of the part and ANCAM handles everything to do with the wheels and the machine. This unique setup provides some very significant benefits. For instance, different wheel diameters can be used for roughing and finishing, wheel dressing can be scheduled at any time and compensations can be applied directly at the machine. All this is possible without re-posting from the CAD/CAM system; a major breakthrough for productivity on the shop floor.

ANCAM architecture

 

Another example is the ability of ANCA’s tool grinders to also perform milling and drilling operations as well as grinding. This can be quite useful for producing modular femoral necks and knee trials (sizers).

If you’re interested to learn more about grinding rotary instruments, non-rotary instruments or prosthetics please download ANCA’s brochure on medical grinding solutions or contact an ANCA representative to arrange a demo.

  Step 1: Apply some fresh techniques from industrial cutting tool design
  Step 2: Optimize instrument geometry to match the specifics of bone structure
  Step 3: Leverage the advantages of grinding over Swiss turning
  Step 4: Select a material and grinding wheel to suit your bone drill
>>  Step 5: Drill your way deep into the medical components market

A bone drill with an AO shank

5 practical steps to making rotary instruments that surgeons want to use - FREE eCourse

Register to receive the complete eCourse »